....or the cutting and pasting unverifiable theories for fun and profit

Documenting climatology's fascination with regurgitation. Here is a popular example to get you started: Luterbacher and Jones borrow their text from the Mann.

Monday, October 11, 2010

Earlier Report Verbiage Reused in Review Article


(Click on the image for a close up)


(Click on the image for a close up)

Here is an interesting example where a large chunk of an earlier report wound up in a later peer-reviewed paper. R.S. Bradley was a co-author of the later peer-reviewed paper.

http://www.ambiente.gob.ec/userfiles/2092/file/Cambio%20Climatico/Adaptacion/CLIMATE%20CHANGE%20IN%20THE%20TROPICAL%20ANDES%20PART%201.pdf

Author: Vuille
Year: 2007
“In the arid and semiarid regions of the tropics and subtropics more than 80% of
the freshwater supply originates in mountain regions, affecting more than half of the
earth’s population (Messerli, 2001). Much of this water is initially stored as ice in
mountain glaciers and then gradually released over time. Mountain glaciers, such as those found in the tropical Andes, therefore act as a critical buffer against highly seasonal precipitation and provide water at times when rainfall is low or even absent. At the same time these glaciers are particularly sensitive to climate change because they are constantly close to melting conditions. They are arguably the most visible indicator of climate change, due to their fast response time, their sensitivity to climate variations and the clear visibility of their reaction (glacier growth or shrinkage) to the public.”

http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/papers2/vuille2008.pdf
Authors: Mathias Vuille, Bernard Francou, Patrick Wagnon, Irmgard Juen, Georg Kaser, Bryan G. Mark, Raymond S. Bradley
Year: 2008

“In the arid and semiarid regions of the tropics and subtropics more
than 80% of the freshwater supply originates in mountain regions,
affecting populations downstream (Messerli, 2001). Much of this water
is initially stored as ice in mountain glaciers and then gradually released
over time.More than 99% of all tropical glaciers are located in the Andes
(Kaser, 1999) and Andean countries, such as Bolivia or Peru, rely to a
great extent on freshwater from glaciated basins during the dry season.
Mountain glaciers, such as those found in the tropical Andes, therefore
act as a critical buffer against highly seasonal precipitation and provide
water for domestic, agricultural or industrial use at timeswhen rainfall is
low or even absent. At the same time these glaciers are particularly
sensitive to climate change because they are constantly close tomelting
conditions. They are arguably the most visible indicator of climate
change, due to their fast response time, their sensitivity to climate
variations and the clear visibility of their reaction (glacier growth or
shrinkage) to the public.”

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