....or the cutting and pasting unverifiable theories for fun and profit

Documenting climatology's fascination with regurgitation. Here is a popular example to get you started: Luterbacher and Jones borrow their text from the Mann.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Jones and Coauthors Apparently Plagiarize Mann and Coauthors


(Click on the image for a close up)


(Click on the image for a close up)

A curious 'borrowing' of text from Mann et al's 2008 paper found in a book chapter published by Luterbacher et al in 2010. The author list for the Luterbacher chapter includes Phil Jones of the internationally famous CRU.

http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/papers2/mann2008.pdf
(‘by’ Michael E. Mann, Zhihua Zhang, Malcolm K. Hughes, Raymond S. Bradley, Sonya K. Miller, Scott Rutherford, and Fenbiao Ni)

Mann et al: “Knowledge of climate during past centuries can both improve
our understanding of natural climate variability and help
address the question of whether modern climate change is unprecedented
in a long-term context (1, 2). The lack of widespread
instrumental climate records before the mid 19th century, however,
necessitates the use of natural climate archives or ‘‘proxy’’ data such
as tree-rings, corals, and ice cores and historical documentary
records to reconstruct climate in past centuries. Many previous
proxy data studies have emphasized hemispheric or global mean
temperature (3–14), although some studies have also attempted to
reconstruct the underlying spatial patterns of past surface temperature
changes at global (15, 16) and regional (6, 17, 18) scales.”

and

http://books.google.com/books?id=AK6gWFaURMsC&lpg=PR1&pg=PA3#v=onepage&q&f=false
(‘by’ Jürg Luterbacher, Elena Xoplaki, Marcel Küttel, Eduardo Zorita, Jesus Fidel González-Rouco, Phil D. Jones, Marco Stössel, This Rutishauser, Heinz Wanner, Joanna Wibig, and Rajmund Przybylak)
(also available here: http://faculty.washington.edu/mkuettel/docs/Luterbacheretal_Springer_2010.pdf)

Luterbacher et al: “The knowledge of climate and its variability during the past centuries can improve our understanding of natural climate variability and also help to address the question of whether modern climate change is unprecedented in a long-term context (Folland et al. 2001; Jansen et al. 2007; Hegerl et al. 2007; Mann et al. 2008 and references therein). The lack of widespread instrumental climate records introduces the need for the use of natural climate archives from ‘proxy’ data such as tree-rings, corals, speleothems and ice cores, as well as documentary evidence to reconstruct climate in past centuries (see Jones et al. 2009 for a review). The focus of many previous proxy data studies has been hemispheric or global mean temperature (see Jansen et al. 2007; Mann et al. 2008 and references therein), although some studies have also attempted to reconstruct the underlying large-scale spatial patterns of past surface temperature and precipitation changes at continental scales.”

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