....or the cutting and pasting unverifiable theories for fun and profit

Documenting climatology's fascination with regurgitation. Here is a popular example to get you started: Luterbacher and Jones borrow their text from the Mann.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Grand Opening Sentence Take II




If an opening gambit resonates - reuse it! The more times it appears in print, after all, the more correct the underlying science must be, surely everyone can follow that logic and this is how cargo cult science works after all. Collect the accoutrements and surely the facts must follow.

Two R.S. Bradley openings follow:

"It is often stated that climate in Medieval time was warm, or warmer than “today”.
Such a statement might seem innocuous – a mere scientific curiosity -- but it has
wider significance. For those opposed to action on global warming, the climate in
Medieval time has become a cause célèbre."
http://stephenschneider.stanford.edu/Publications/PDF_Papers/Bradley.pdf

"Climate in Medieval time is often said to have been as warm as, or warmer
than, it is “today.” Such a statement might seem innocuous. But for those opposed
to action on global warming, it has become a cause célèbre:"
http://www.geo.umass.edu/faculty/bradley/bradley2003d.pdf

You would think that simply proving that the climate in Medieval times was cooler than today once would be enough. Of course, you would be thinking far too scientifically. As this is climatology, the proof lies in the number of repetitions of the so called proof, not in any actual proof.

Monday, November 22, 2010

Climatologically Inspired Poetry

In this article, we use the terms 'climatologically', 'inspired', and 'poetry' rather loosely. But, I thought that collecting a few of the jottings of climatologically challenged individuals here might not go amiss. As far as I know the plagiarisms involved are egregious but not actually anti-scientific.

From: http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2010/4/8/josh-17.html
For Lucia, with thanks for the haikus.
(Blame Mike Post and Don Pablo for quoting Shelley the other day and setting me off.)

I met a traveller from a distant shire
Who said: A vast and pointless shaft of steel
Stands on a hill top… Near it, in the mire,
Half sunk, a shattered turbine lies, whose wheels
And riven blades and snarls of coloured wire
Tell that its owners well their mission read
Which did not last nor, nowhere to be seen,
The hand that paid them and the empty head.
And scrawled around the base these lines are clear:
‘My name is Millibandias, greenest Green.
Look on my works, ye doubters, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round this display
Of reckless cost and loss, blotless and fair,
The green and pleasant landscape rolls away.
Apr 8, 2010 at 7:09 PM | Unregistered Commenter Dreadnought

From: http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2010/4/9/the-modern-climatologist.html

The Rime of the Ancient Climateer (Abridged)

It is an ancient climateer
And he stoppeth one of three
'By thy long grey beard and glittering eye,
Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?

He holds him with his clammy hand,
'There was a rise,' quoth he.
'Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!'
'It was no trick', quoth he.

God save thee ancient climateer
From the fiends, that plaugue thy mind
Why look'st thou so? 'With my eraser
I removed the graph's decline.'
Apr 10, 2010 at 12:05 AM | Unregistered Commenter STC
From: http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2010/4/9/the-modern-climatologist.html

I am the very model of a modern climatologist
I’m partly statistician, partly palaeo-phrenologist
I’ve temperature readings from thermometers coniferous
my data are the same (or not, well, maybe) as Keith Briffa has
I bought them from a bloke who brought them hotfoot from Siberia
and mixed them with some algae from the mud in Lake Superior.
When counting different isotopes I’m really in my element
and sucking up to journalists from Guardian Environment
I know what makes the treerings from Siberia to the Rockies tick
And I can make spaghetti and transform it to a hockeystick.
My data’s got dark matter that would shatter a cosmologist
I am the very model of a modern climatologist

From: http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2010/11/21/realclimates-take-on-the-year.html

There was a climatologist from Penn State
who studied tree rings and their growth rate
he found quite a few
which grew fast with CO2
but none after 1960, hence climategate.
Nov 21, 2010 at 10:49 PM | Unregistered Commenter lapogus

From: http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2010/11/21/realclimates-take-on-the-year.html
There was a climatologist from NASA
Who could argue in terms post-Kafka
He hid the decline
Upheld the team's line
Endlessly reciting the old mantra

Nov 21, 2010 at 9:24 PM | Unregistered Commenter ZT

Monday, November 8, 2010

Manning the Copy-and-Paste Stations


(Click on the image for a close up)

(Click on the image for a close up)

Another example of the urgent need to spread the message in climatology. This time Michael Mann recycling text from Science to an encyclopedia on paleoclimatology. Where would climatology be without copy-and paste? You can see the original articles here (well one of them may be original):
http://www.meteo.psu.edu/~mann/shared/articles/MannPersp2002.pdf
http://books.google.com/books?id=yRMgYc-8mTIC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA179#v=onepage&q&f=false

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Michael E. Mann and his Familiar Interviews

Over at Bishop Hill, Shub nicely illustrated the uncanny knack that uber-climatologist, Michael E. Mann has for recycling. In two separate (apparent) interviews, the good climatologist managed to produce the same chunk of text in response to two separate questions, from two different interviewers, for different publications. Extraordinary efficiency? Perhaps, but certainly an example of the systematic trumping of quality by quantity in climatology.

Here's the link a Bishop Hill's http://www.bishop-hill.net/blog/2010/11/6/mann-goes-atomic.html

Michael Mann in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists:
Q: "What’s all of this been like for you personally?" (see http://bos.sagepub.com/content/66/6/1.full)

I’ve been the subject of attacks by climate-change deniers for more than a decade now, because of the prominent role that the “hockey stick” temperature reconstruction has played in the public discourse on climate change. This doesn’t mean that I’m numb to the outrageous attacks against me and other climate scientists. But I’m not surprised by anything anymore. There is nothing, it would seem, that that the climate-change denial industry isn’t willing to do in their attempts to thwart policy action to combat human-caused climate change. While the attacks have been tough to deal with at times, I’ve had a huge amount of support from my colleagues, other scientists, and ordinary citizens who have come out of the woodwork just to thank me for my contributions.

Michael Mann in Britannica Blog:
Q: "You personally faced charges of data tampering and deviating from the accepted practices of your field as a result of the release of the e-mails from CRU. Although you were fully exonerated, what effect did the investigation have on how you think climate science should be conducted?" (see http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2010/10/the-science-of-climate-change-5-questions-for-climatologist-michael-e-mann/)

I’ve been the subject of attacks by climate change deniers for more than a decade now, because of the prominent role that the “hockey stick” temperature reconstruction has played in the public discourse on climate change. This doesn’t mean that I’m numb to the outrageous attacks against me and other climate scientists. But I’m not surprised by anything anymore. There is nothing, it would seem, that the climate change denial industry isn’t willing to do in their attempts to thwart policy action to combat human-caused climate change. While the attacks have been tough to deal with at times, I’ve had a huge amount of support from my colleagues, other scientists, and ordinary citizens who have come out of the woodwork just to thank me for my contributions.

So, the journalists produced independent questions, yet Michael Mann produced a precisely the same answers. Well, I say precisely, actually a mistake has been corrected for the Britannica piece "...seem, that that the climate-change..." became "...seem, that the climate change..." so either the Britannica has better editing, or that detailed answer improved in the reciting.

And just when you think that this might be a one off, you notice that this piece of text exists in both pieces.
Britannica:
"Mann: While the attacks against climate science may have energized climate change deniers, and those who derive their information from talk radio..."

Bulletin of Atomic Scientists:
"MANN: While the attacks against climate science may have energized climate-change deniers, and those who derive their information from talk radio..."

Anyone would think that Michael Mann had some kind of prepared position that he was desperately feeding into any available outlet. Why not simply prove the case scientifically? The science is so strong, right?

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Easterling: Falsification of a Hypothesis of Limited Applicability in the Study of Climate Change

In my ongoing effort to understand climatology, and its limited adherence to scientific conventions, I came across the following passage from the Penn State investigation and exoneration of Michael E. Mann.

"In a follow-up question, Dr. Easterling was asked whether he saw any difference between certain kinds of experimental scientific fields and observational ones like paleoclimatology. He responded by stating that much of what we know about climate change is the result of a combination of observation and numerical modeling, making the classic idea of falsification of a hypothesis, which may be applicable to a laboratory science, of limited applicability in the study of climate change."

(From: http://live.psu.edu/fullimg/userpics/10026/Final_Investigation_Report.pdf)

Well, that's good to know. Paleoclimatology is beyond hypothesis falsification!

That probably accounts for the other issues which are beyond scientific norms: e.g. basic statistical correctness, cherry picking, extreme article recycling (aka plagiarism), etc.